1 minute reading time (88 words)

Sonar Drum Maps

This video was created several years ago (in Sonar 5) but this information still applied in Sonar 8.5.3, so if you are having an issue with a drum map or you just want to learn a little bit more about them, please watch this video. I show how to create a drum map from the notes that are on a midi track, how to assign different notes within the kit to different hardware or software synths (VST), and a few practical applications where drum maps have helped me. 

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Comments 2

Ron on Tuesday, 27 February 2018 06:54

Ok, so WHY do you even work with drum maps? Are they for inputs to control Sonar, or the other way around?

Ok, so WHY do you even work with drum maps? Are they for inputs to control Sonar, or the other way around?
Blades on Monday, 09 April 2018 22:08

Hi Ron. I just saw your comment. Sorry for the delay in my reply if you are still able to see it.

WHY? I think I explained somewhere in the video, but the short answer for me is that the midi display of the drum notes in a recorded midi track is better for a few reasons:

  • The drums are in the order I want them (kick at the bottom, then snare, toms, cymbals).
  • The midi stream is limited to show ONLY the notes I want to see - those that are associated with pads on my drum kit. I don't have to see a bunch of empty note rows like I would with a standard midi track.
  • The individual instruments are solo and mute capable. I can solo out just the snare or the kick or whatever grouping I want without having to split out the midi to separate tracks or without having to record to audio to be able to do the same. This makes it easy for me to fix parts within the midi kit right from inside of the DAW.
  • I can choose to send certain kit parts out to other places if I want, again without having to split the midi out to separate tracks. I can send just the kick or snare or whatever out to a VST, my drum brain, Handsonic, or wherever I want very quickly.


I hope that this gives just a few reasons for why I use the drum maps and not just a regular MIDI track.

Hi Ron. I just saw your comment. Sorry for the delay in my reply if you are still able to see it. WHY? I think I explained somewhere in the video, but the short answer for me is that the midi display of the drum notes in a recorded midi track is better for a few reasons: [list] [*]The drums are in the order I want them (kick at the bottom, then snare, toms, cymbals). [*]The midi stream is limited to show ONLY the notes I want to see - those that are associated with pads on my drum kit. I don't have to see a bunch of empty note rows like I would with a standard midi track. [*]The individual instruments are solo and mute capable. I can solo out just the snare or the kick or whatever grouping I want without having to split out the midi to separate tracks or without having to record to audio to be able to do the same. This makes it easy for me to fix parts within the midi kit right from inside of the DAW. [*]I can choose to send certain kit parts out to other places if I want, again without having to split the midi out to separate tracks. I can send just the kick or snare or whatever out to a VST, my drum brain, Handsonic, or wherever I want very quickly. [/list] I hope that this gives just a few reasons for why I use the drum maps and not just a regular MIDI track.
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Monday, 10 December 2018
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